Posts Tagged ‘neighborhood’

Life Always Using Sensationalism to Target Black Community

Today here in Chicago, Life Always is expected to unveil a 30-billboard campaign featuring President Obama’s face and the words “Every 21 minutes, our next possible leader is aborted.”

Life Always is planning to“launch” their sensational billboards this morning at 11 a.m. near vacant lot at 5812 S. State Street, here on the south side, a part of the city that is predominantly Black and densely impoverished.

Life Always is the same group responsible for the disgusting billboard in NYC that claimed “the most dangerous place for an African American is in the womb.” And  in ATL, their propaganda claimed “Black Children are an Endangered Species.”

These billboards are all tactics in this group’s concerted effort to silence and take away a woman’s right to choose.

Their tactic is to use guilt, misinformation, and limit reproductive justice. This fight may very well be used to perpetuate political interests and affect Roe v. Wade decision.

Much like activists in NYC and Sister Song in ATL, sisters and brothers in Chicago cannot allow Life Always to target our families with bombastic and exploitative messaging that incites fear and guilt, trivializes a complex and emotional human rights issue.

Today, a reproductive justice coalition will attend the press conference. I have also started a petition on Change. org

Please visit and sign the petition letting Life Always know their tactics do not support reproductive justice, human or civil rights, nor does it serve the best interest of Black and Latino communities.

We want to let Life Always know the African-American community does not welcome its exploitive and politically motivated billboards in any city of our nation.

We are demanding that Life Always cease and desist with its marketing scheme that uses sensational anti-abortion rhetoric to target Blacks and Latinos.

We do not want an influx of their billboards in NYC, Chicago, Dallas, LA, Atlanta, Detroit, Philadelphia, etc.

Please sign the petition and share with your friends and community. You should also contact Marissa Gabrysch at Life Always 210.617.0967 and share your outrage at these sensational billboard antics.

Stay tuned for updates and I’ll be live tweeting from press conference today, posting video and audio.

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Qualifications of a Change Agent

Saving the next generation is arguably the most pressing issue our community faces. The violence is deafening. The hyper-sexualized chorus of hot mommas and dope boys harmonizing over raging hormones and chemical imbalances is overwhelming. Startling statistics of illiteracy paralyze self-confidence and cripple ambition. There is desperation for resolve…a healing.

So many have researched and studied the systematic depression we find ourselves. From government entities to pedagogic institutions to interests groups many have invested in white papers and measured case studies. None though, have invested in solutions.

Yet there are those who know all too well what ails us. They are the ones living it. They are the ones perpetuating it. Too often they are the ones allowing our sickness to go untreated within our own families and neighborhoods.

The reality is, saving a generation is but a small facet of the problems the Black community faces. The larger of which is that generations are suffering. Mainly because for generations, able bodied and able minded people who recognize solutions that could begin to fix some of the wrongs are sitting back, waiting for the next person to save the day.

This is in large part due to how those government and pedagogic institutions identify great minds within our community who can play an integral role in their studies. These special minds are granted access to resources that enhance their natural minds. It is a wonderful thing when they return and give honor to the community.

However, because of their well-earned titles, often they are looked to be saviors. Preacher, educator, social worker, doctor, lawyer, celebrity are all assumed to be the answer. If any of them belong to a sorority, fraternity or professional organization they are really thought to possess the cure-all. Fact of the matter, while many of these people are driven everyday by a passion to help their communities, they are no more equipped to solve our issues than the other titled members of our community like mothers, fathers, uncles, god fathers, god mothers, neighbors, barbers, beauticians, shoe shiners, janitors, and elders.

Although the same government and pedagogic institutions tend to indoctrinate everyone with the belief that only the special people can help with societal dilemmas, we have got to embrace the redeeming value in members of our community who are not so sophisticated.

We have to believe, again, that though tongues may not possess articulate ponderings or because vocabularies are heavily laced with vernacular, every one of us have the ability to better our community. We all have what it takes to be a change agent.

Yet, I see it often. A school community that seeks only to provide support and resources for its students, but never fully engage families to take a responsible role. Panels are convened but missing is the voice of common people. Politicians seeking the vote from common folk, but rationing out provisions and incentives to social service agencies that manifest the “missionary” mind set that they have to deliver the community from itself, never going within to find solvent cures.

The reality is, in urban America a young black male can absorb as much knowledge sitting in a barbershop on a Saturday morning as he would sitting one week in a classroom.

There is an unassuming woman on the south side of Chicago saving lives. She doesn’t have any illustrious titles preceding her name, nor following. She is not a member of a high-profile family. This woman, Diane Latiker simply saw devastation around her and went into survival mode to ease the trauma. Diane started Kids Off the Block, an after-school tutoring and mentoring program, and infected other everyday folks like entrepreneurs and others who belong to neighborhood social clubs.

Across town on the southwest side one man, Sy Smith, leads a national movement, National Block Club University, where he empowers neighborhood residents to combat the crime in their area. He has an all hands on deck approach.

That is the point of it all. Obviously there is a sense of pride we all feel when our treasures are found and valued by others. We bask in the validation that we have produced and nurtured those who represent the super heroes amongst us. Still, there has to be an equation of value and balance. Time to stop putting it all on the shoulders of our educators, doctors, lawyers, preachers, etc. All of us can touch a life and brighten circumstances. We have to have confidence that we too are special enough to do the work of healing our community.

Question is what is holding us back from recognizing this?