Posts Tagged ‘statistics’

Missrepresentation—what we need to see on TV!

As soon as the link popped into my Twitter timeline, I was compelled to see what MissRepresentation was all about. I watched the trailer and immediately recognized this documentary was speaking to me, about me and for me. For goodness sake, what woman has not felt slighted and exploited by media because of her gender? In today’s society one of the most powerful forces in the universe, feminine energy and perspective, are discounted and played cheap by media powers that be.

But I think the world had better get ready to reckon with women everywhere as Missrepresentation has remixed our view, put the spotlight where it belongs. The film made its debut at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival and was subsequently picked up by the mighty Oprah Winfrey Network as a part of its documentary Club. Before January 2011, there has not been a space for this kind of film on network television. That is not until a woman owned a television network. Marinate on that thought and absorb the powerful impact…

I can hardly express how excited I was when I was invited to screen the film on the Rosie O’Donnell Show, taped here in Chicago at Harpo Studios. Without giving away too much, I will say the statistics that are revealed in the film, the incredible testimonies, pull you out of the graphic haze of American media. It forces us as viewers to give a critical eye to the portrayal of women in the media and how this shapes our society.

Missrepresentation is a conversation-starter. Yet, beyond the revelations, shocking stats and information, the take away is that everyone who watches will have clear direction on next steps. It is a film that empowers with the knowledge and belief that we can make a difference to change the media landscape to be better for our daughters and future generations of boys and girls alike. Each viewer understands it is our individual responsibility to do so.

So much of the film resonated with me, but more than anything there was a phrase from one of the doc’s sources. It struck me and held me captive. It is because of the implications of this phrase is what pushed me to create my program Girls Like Me. I caught my breath in an Oprah “aha moment,” that I’d been given a name, a way to articulate what I have felt since I was a little girl watching television.

It was so powerful for me, that I jumped up to ask the first question when Rosie opened the floor to the audience. If I don’t get left on the editor’s cutting floor, you’ll be able to hear for yourself what struck me so.

Still, my question is but among the millions you and others will have after watching. I know you will hear the call of action, too. So take a moment to view the trailer, then be sure to tune in to OWN, Thursday, October 20 at 9/8 CST. I can’t wait for us to watch it collectively and move the discussion forward!

In the meantime, take the first steps in challenging the media’s portrayal of women:

Like the MissRepresentation FB page

Follow MissRepresentation on Twitter

Now take the pledge to represent!

Occupy Wall Street Head Count: Who’s representing the 99?

For weeks now I’ve been observing Occupy Wall Street along with the rest of the world. I’ve sat back, a bit stand-offish, watching my Twitter timeline, news and the internet pulsing while I just try to grasp who/what this movement is about. True to my character, I’m always down for some opposition to any form of oppression and the status quo. The momentum OWS has created can only be attributed to the disenchantment of the American people. So in principle, #OWS has my moral support. But…

For one thing, I read an article which was bemoaning appearances of solidarity from entertainers such as Kanye West, but lauded that of others. The main gripe was that Kanye flaunts his material possessions in his music and dresses rather flamboyantly. Hmmm. Even as I consider all of this, I have to recognize Kanye is in no way comparatively as wealthy as billionaire bankers or those who own the media companies which distribute his music.

So, if Kanye is not a part of the 99% because he is rich today, then who makes up the 99%. Is there a certain income bracket that qualifies in that number? I have to ask. If rappers or athletes who grew up in poverty are now not allowed to represent for that faction, who gets to make that call. Who is setting the bar for the 99%?

See, I still need clarity on a few other things like the vision of outcomes. For me, growing up poor, I need to connect a few things. I need tangible follow up actions and demands that impacts the working class and the poor.

Now, I understand what it means to have presence in a march and/or demonstration, still what are the demands/action plan beyond that? What are the desired outcomes?

Because honestly vacant houses, evictions, no access to preventive health care and jobs, compounded by the shittiest education in the world has been reality of many Americans.

I mean, clearly, Katrina aftermath painted the picture of a huge percentage overlooked in the equation of slices cut from the American pie.

And while there may be those who require statistics to relate to the way poverty and systematic injustice crushes a large percentage of us, there are those who are living it. Everyday… for generations. Among that class of people, mortgages, 401Ks, college tuition, jobs are as familiar as Mars water. I mean, there’s some talk of it all, but the likelihood of experiencing any of it is yet a distant possibility in their lifetime.

This is what I am closest to. More than those who work on Wall Street, and little more than those who are typically identified as the middle class, I can relate to the working class and poor.

And many among us are asking the questions. If the 99% are rising up now, did they not feel any outrage or cause to do so after Katrina or perhaps at the fallacy of our education system- the perpetual pipeline to prisons that also profits not only corporations but middle class law enforcement personnel and rural blue collar towns across this country?

Isn’t it natural to look for the thread, feel compelled by a need to understand how #OWS trickles down to folks who are truly at the bottom, those who have been systematically locked out?

It begs the question, is there a flaw in the mathematics of the 99%?

Historically, working class/poor have ALWAYS marched and protested. Let us not ignore the history lesson of poor Blacks. We lead full revolutions that benefit America, yet marginalize us in terms of policy and systematic injustices.

They may not feel inclined to join the current “struggle.” Perhaps they have a hard time occupying anything when they have to report to a job everyday that only pays minimum wage with no benefits in which to take off to occupy a doctor’s office with their very sick child poses a calculated, catch 20/20 decision. Perhaps they want to join, but must occupy the home registered to the ankle bracelet they are forcibly wearing due to house arrest. Or maybe, even, they cannot afford bus fare to ride to the areas where the occupation is taking place in their cities. These maybes are very real for many. Can you relate to that?

Now don’t misread my commentary. There are those who believe as I do, that it is not cool to allow anyone else to fight your battles. We want nothing more than to take our swing in the ring with institutionalized injustice and systemic oppression.

Still there is the quandary: if we go all in, will we be invited to the table when they slice the pie or will get the traditional crumbs?

I’ll admit, #OWS has my admiration and appreciation. There is power in its symbolism.

And while, I am still left with doubts of how things will play out for poor Blacks in the hood, it pleased me to see this well stated article that addressed some of my concerns. And this one really is impressive.

What about you? Do you think Americans can side step historical context of racial oppression and how it feeds the system to unite in a fight that revolutionizes our country in a way it has not since the Revolutionary War?

And I promise not to sit idly by waiting to see, I’ll join and give support (resources/expertise). On the other hand though, the Black hand side, I’ll keep posing these questions.

While we’re contemplating, these maybe convincing for some

Perhaps if our President moved beyond rhetoric and offered decisive leadership, the movement would swell to a full-blown revolution. Maybe….

Qualifications of a Change Agent

Saving the next generation is arguably the most pressing issue our community faces. The violence is deafening. The hyper-sexualized chorus of hot mommas and dope boys harmonizing over raging hormones and chemical imbalances is overwhelming. Startling statistics of illiteracy paralyze self-confidence and cripple ambition. There is desperation for resolve…a healing.

So many have researched and studied the systematic depression we find ourselves. From government entities to pedagogic institutions to interests groups many have invested in white papers and measured case studies. None though, have invested in solutions.

Yet there are those who know all too well what ails us. They are the ones living it. They are the ones perpetuating it. Too often they are the ones allowing our sickness to go untreated within our own families and neighborhoods.

The reality is, saving a generation is but a small facet of the problems the Black community faces. The larger of which is that generations are suffering. Mainly because for generations, able bodied and able minded people who recognize solutions that could begin to fix some of the wrongs are sitting back, waiting for the next person to save the day.

This is in large part due to how those government and pedagogic institutions identify great minds within our community who can play an integral role in their studies. These special minds are granted access to resources that enhance their natural minds. It is a wonderful thing when they return and give honor to the community.

However, because of their well-earned titles, often they are looked to be saviors. Preacher, educator, social worker, doctor, lawyer, celebrity are all assumed to be the answer. If any of them belong to a sorority, fraternity or professional organization they are really thought to possess the cure-all. Fact of the matter, while many of these people are driven everyday by a passion to help their communities, they are no more equipped to solve our issues than the other titled members of our community like mothers, fathers, uncles, god fathers, god mothers, neighbors, barbers, beauticians, shoe shiners, janitors, and elders.

Although the same government and pedagogic institutions tend to indoctrinate everyone with the belief that only the special people can help with societal dilemmas, we have got to embrace the redeeming value in members of our community who are not so sophisticated.

We have to believe, again, that though tongues may not possess articulate ponderings or because vocabularies are heavily laced with vernacular, every one of us have the ability to better our community. We all have what it takes to be a change agent.

Yet, I see it often. A school community that seeks only to provide support and resources for its students, but never fully engage families to take a responsible role. Panels are convened but missing is the voice of common people. Politicians seeking the vote from common folk, but rationing out provisions and incentives to social service agencies that manifest the “missionary” mind set that they have to deliver the community from itself, never going within to find solvent cures.

The reality is, in urban America a young black male can absorb as much knowledge sitting in a barbershop on a Saturday morning as he would sitting one week in a classroom.

There is an unassuming woman on the south side of Chicago saving lives. She doesn’t have any illustrious titles preceding her name, nor following. She is not a member of a high-profile family. This woman, Diane Latiker simply saw devastation around her and went into survival mode to ease the trauma. Diane started Kids Off the Block, an after-school tutoring and mentoring program, and infected other everyday folks like entrepreneurs and others who belong to neighborhood social clubs.

Across town on the southwest side one man, Sy Smith, leads a national movement, National Block Club University, where he empowers neighborhood residents to combat the crime in their area. He has an all hands on deck approach.

That is the point of it all. Obviously there is a sense of pride we all feel when our treasures are found and valued by others. We bask in the validation that we have produced and nurtured those who represent the super heroes amongst us. Still, there has to be an equation of value and balance. Time to stop putting it all on the shoulders of our educators, doctors, lawyers, preachers, etc. All of us can touch a life and brighten circumstances. We have to have confidence that we too are special enough to do the work of healing our community.

Question is what is holding us back from recognizing this?